Reflexions…On Questioning

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It’s been a prolonged silence since my last post. I have been sitting with this resistance, trying to make sense of what exactly was going on inside me, and realised that, ultimately, I have been questioning myself, my role, and my profession.

I found myself in clinical supervision the other week, questioning whether I would like to be a therapist for a long time, or not. A great gift I’ve received in my life is an ability to learn lessons quickly. This ability goes hand in hand with my other key ability of being able to empathise deeply and sensitively with almost everyone. By feeling deeply, I have often arrived at insights and personal resolutions, quicker than other people in my life going through similar trials and tribulations. But this may often also feel like a curse. The deep and intense feelings, followed by insight and resolution, followed by a continuous “what’s next?”. Sometimes, this is extremely tiring. And I feel that this is where I have been recently.

I am a therapist who believes that whilst a therapeutic training and education can indeed be used to help anyone in any kind of circumstance, the therapeutic relationship can also be much deeper and purposeful when I work with clients going through the lessons that I’ve been through. I often say that my areas of expertise are not an accident.

And maybe it’s a phase that every therapist goes through – but no one really talks about – or maybe I’m particularly tired this month, but I would be dishonest if I didn’t admit that this question popped up in my mind this month, startling my sense of identity and purpose: “Is this really all I want to do and be?” The answer was a very strong NO, which is still echoing in my heart.

I feel that I have come to this standpoint after a continuous and quiet questioning of the therapeutic process itself. What is its purpose? How do I understand healing, personally?

I used to think that therapy was supposed to help people overcome internal obstacles, and by default, external ones as well. And that healing would come from that process of transformation. But I guess what I have been really questioning is this idea of overcoming. I’m not necessarily basing this on any specific theory or methodology, simply on my own experiences and understanding.

Because what I continue to witness in my therapy rooms and sessions is a revolving door of the same presentations, conflicts, histories, narratives, in different people, with slightly different nuances, but the same. Even with the same person, when I think something has been processed, there’s another layer. And I wrote about this in a past blog entry. This idea that, yes, we can always keep digging, there are always more layers, more nuances to explore, more depth, more intensity, more pain, more trauma, more, more, more. But at what point do we stop looking backwards, into the past?

These questions are for me, really. I don’t intend to imply that every therapist might be questioning this, and maybe for some professionals these matters are very black and white. I just feel that I spend a lot of time in the grey areas, wondering what the balance is between past and future. And wondering whether we actually overcome anything? Does an experience such as a trauma ever disappear? How does overcoming and healing apply to trauma? Does it ever go away? What is my job in relation to these questions?

For instance, the complexities of gay men’s mental health. And when I say complexities, I mean that, based not just on clients’ experiences, but also my own. All these studies and articles of how gay men are more susceptible to more ill mental health, substance misuse, addiction, compulsive behaviour, suicidal ideation, bullying, abuse, etc. Sometimes, I’m reading academic or clinical articles, and I’m thinking “No kidding!”. I could write an article about my life and use that as a template.

Many other client groups have this experience – I’m calling it the intersectionality of pain. Pain does not discriminate, and it often doesn’t just stay on the one lane. It’s a complex web of experiences, which by moving something here, will trigger something there, and then by going there, will trigger something else further away or down, and on, and on. This is just my own process. And if I go through this, I am certain many others experience the same. All of us could spend the rest of our lives in therapy. But is that the point? Is it possible to move forward, simply by moving forward?

And I bring this particular example up, because its constant presence in clinical presentations makes me question whether the therapy may also focus on other aspects of a person’s life. I have created this session for groups which I lovingly call “The Gift Session”. It’s a session where I help individuals become aware of their inner qualities, their inner light. Just because. No other reason, no agenda. Just that. And someone usually asks “How is this relevant? I thought we were here to deal with our pain?” So, in every “Gift Session”, I usually need to explore why people tend to reject the gift of becoming aware of their inner light, and why/how that awareness could actually be the key to the end of their suffering.

Could therapeutic work focusing on qualities and inner light literally and figuratively illuminate the way through the suffering and chaos? How much healing and peace can we find through continuous exploration and analysis of pain and trauma?

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Author: healingcontinuum

A multidisciplinary practitioner living and working in London who combines drama and psychotherapy in a new approach to healing and transformation.