Ask the Dramatherapist…”The Client’s Role”

crayons

I was recently invited to participate in a research study about Dramatherapy as a psychological therapy and profession. I met up with the researcher last week, where she asked me a series of questions about the different aspects of my practice. After asking me what I perceived the role of the therapist to be, she asked me “What is the role of the client?”

I will admit to you, as I admitted to her: I don’t think anyone has ever asked me that question before, and I don’t know if I have spent much time considering it either. This startled me, and I have been thinking about it ever since. What is the role of the client? WHAT IS THE ROLE OF THE CLIENT?

Have other therapists considered this before? Am I alone in this?

I mean, I have considered many aspects of the client’s experience and process, but I don’t remember anyone ever phrasing it in such a way. What is their role?

This is my response, and reflection, as of February 2017, a week after the question was first posed to me. I believe that my views on this will probably change as time passes, and experience settles, but this is my here and now, and good enough, response.

As it is often common in the life of a therapist, whenever a big question comes up, it tends to show up within therapy sessions, in very unexpected ways.

A few days ago, as I was concluding a group session and making a summary of the work and insights the group had undertaken and experienced, I found myself talking about my role, and their role.

Within that discussion, I was stating that I tend to see the therapeutic process, not so much as a discovery of something, but as a re-discovery. Meaning that, I truly believe each person knows themselves better than anyone else, but their intuition and reason are often clouded by judgement, fear, doubt, expectations, pressures. Everyone has and experiences glimpses into their core every now and then, which we tend to dismiss as “odd”, “peculiar”, “unreasonable”.

My perception of what I do as a Dramatherapist is often of a guide through these clouds. I’m not influenced by someone’s judgement, fear, doubt, expectations, or pressures, which makes me able to navigate through these clouds with curiosity, empathy, and clarity. My role is often about helping to remove the clouds, not so that clients can discover themselves, but so that they can re-discover themselves. Everyone has and experiences glimpses into their core every now and then. We all know what we feel and think, whether or not we have the vocabulary to express it to others. These are different matters: the knowing and the expressing.

And so, as I continued with this metaphor of clouds and removing them, I found myself saying to my Monday group that their role was to make decisions, to choose. Let’s pause here and imagine that I am guiding you through your clouds. As a Dramatherapist, I will do that through prompts: “I notice that… your body language has changed; your tone of voice is different; you said this but did that; where would you like to go next?; what would you like to do next?; to say?; breathe, don’t forget your breathing; pause, take a moment or two; what does it look like, feel like?; it’s okay; I’m here.”

These prompts represent opportunities for the client to choose: to say something, to do something, to ask something, to express, to hide, to move forward, to move backwards, to remain, to settle, to change.

As I guide someone through their own clouds, I will make observations about what I see, notice, and feel, in the therapy space and all of this is meant to create clarity about the different choices a client has in those moments, but also in their lives outside the therapy room. I can do that for them, but then I can’t make any choices for them.

However, to make a choice, one must have the awareness that one has a choice. It also then involves personal responsibility and autonomy. The therapeutic process, and the therapist, must aid in this: the empowerment and awareness of personal responsibility and autonomy. This may sound like too much, but that’s why therapy isn’t always easy, and it shouldn’t be. It should make things simpler, but not necessarily easier.

And a choice doesn’t have to be of the life-changing capacity either. A choice can be as simple as choosing a pencil over a crayon. And the more often one makes simple choices, the easier it becomes to make more complex ones. But the choice must always be made by the client, and this is how I see the client’s role: to make a choice.

It feels like this: I guide a client through something, I make my observations and present the choices at hand, momentarily remove myself from the dynamic so the client can make a choice, and once the choice is made, I return to the dynamic to continue the journey through the clouds. That split second and moment of temporary withdrawal on my part is designed to allow the client to feel that they have made a choice on their own. Small moments like these, of choosing a pencil over a crayon, or the colour of a piece of paper, is what signals to the conscious and unconscious mind, as well as someone’s heart and spirit, that they are in control and empowered.

 

 

 

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Author: healingcontinuum

A multidisciplinary practitioner living and working in London who combines drama and psychotherapy in a new approach to healing and transformation.